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vintageblackglamour:

People tend to say the same two things about Dorothy Dandridge (“She was so beautiful!” “Her life was so tragic!”) Well, she was definitely beautiful (by most counts on the inside and out) and she did endure tough challenges in her life, but she was also a relentless hard worker. When she was not rehearsing for one of her nightclub performances, she was studying acting and dance and constantly working to create more opportunities for herself in Hollywood. At one point in the 1950s, she teamed up with Nat “King” Cole to pitch a television series where they would play a married couple (“small time” entertainers trying to catch a break in show business). It is our loss that they were turned down all over town (can you imagine watching clips of that today?!) In this photo, Ms. Dandridge is rehearsing with the great composer, arranger and vocal coach Phil Moore in March 1951. Mr. Moore also coached, arranged and/or wrote songs for Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne, Judy Garland, Pearl Bailey, Ava Gardner, Diahann Carroll, Johnny Mathis and The Supremes.

yagazieemezi:

1953: How I Wear My Crown
Often recognized for her face alone, Folasade Titilayo Adeso is not just a model or any photographer’s muse; she is also an artist whose creative vision transcends various mediums. Born in Abeokuta, Nigeria, raised in Canada, Folasade is currently based in New York City; the ideal place to fuel passion and dreams. A talented graphic designer, she recently embarked on a journey to build a legacy for her father who passed away in 2012.
Y: What inspired 1953?
Folasade: My father passed away in 2012 and coming from a family of all girls, it hit me that we would not be able to pass on my father’s name the way men can. When I went home in 2013 I was continuously greeted by family and friends who would say, “Welcome to your father’s land” and that stuck with me. 1953 is the year my father was born and the year that Nigeria became my father’s land.
Y: Tell us more about the head-wraps.
Folasade: Growing up, I would watch my mother tie her head-wraps so intricately on a daily basis. At the age of 22 I started learning to tie my own head-wraps by watching her. Being so far away from Nigeria, wearing head-wraps allow me to feel more connected to home.  It makes me feel so regal and proud not to mention that they are a colorful addition to whatever outfit I may have on! While walking though the market-place with my aunt in Nigeria, I was overwhelmed by the array of bright fabric splayed out in front of me in the stalls. I then realized that I could share how head-wraps made me feel with other women. It’s not just a piece of fabric. It’s a piece of my home. It’s me walking though the market place thinking of the women, my customers and what they would like. My mother has handed down to me some of her own wraps and I know just how long their can last. My wraps are for women to keep and treasure for years to come.
Keep reading + more pictures
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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
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yagazieemezi:

1953: How I Wear My Crown
Often recognized for her face alone, Folasade Titilayo Adeso is not just a model or any photographer’s muse; she is also an artist whose creative vision transcends various mediums. Born in Abeokuta, Nigeria, raised in Canada, Folasade is currently based in New York City; the ideal place to fuel passion and dreams. A talented graphic designer, she recently embarked on a journey to build a legacy for her father who passed away in 2012.
Y: What inspired 1953?
Folasade: My father passed away in 2012 and coming from a family of all girls, it hit me that we would not be able to pass on my father’s name the way men can. When I went home in 2013 I was continuously greeted by family and friends who would say, “Welcome to your father’s land” and that stuck with me. 1953 is the year my father was born and the year that Nigeria became my father’s land.
Y: Tell us more about the head-wraps.
Folasade: Growing up, I would watch my mother tie her head-wraps so intricately on a daily basis. At the age of 22 I started learning to tie my own head-wraps by watching her. Being so far away from Nigeria, wearing head-wraps allow me to feel more connected to home.  It makes me feel so regal and proud not to mention that they are a colorful addition to whatever outfit I may have on! While walking though the market-place with my aunt in Nigeria, I was overwhelmed by the array of bright fabric splayed out in front of me in the stalls. I then realized that I could share how head-wraps made me feel with other women. It’s not just a piece of fabric. It’s a piece of my home. It’s me walking though the market place thinking of the women, my customers and what they would like. My mother has handed down to me some of her own wraps and I know just how long their can last. My wraps are for women to keep and treasure for years to come.
Keep reading + more pictures
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Zoom Info

yagazieemezi:

1953: How I Wear My Crown

Often recognized for her face alone, Folasade Titilayo Adeso is not just a model or any photographer’s muse; she is also an artist whose creative vision transcends various mediums. Born in Abeokuta, Nigeria, raised in Canada, Folasade is currently based in New York City; the ideal place to fuel passion and dreams. A talented graphic designer, she recently embarked on a journey to build a legacy for her father who passed away in 2012.

Y: What inspired 1953?

Folasade: My father passed away in 2012 and coming from a family of all girls, it hit me that we would not be able to pass on my father’s name the way men can. When I went home in 2013 I was continuously greeted by family and friends who would say, “Welcome to your father’s land” and that stuck with me. 1953 is the year my father was born and the year that Nigeria became my father’s land.

Y: Tell us more about the head-wraps.

Folasade: Growing up, I would watch my mother tie her head-wraps so intricately on a daily basis. At the age of 22 I started learning to tie my own head-wraps by watching her. Being so far away from Nigeria, wearing head-wraps allow me to feel more connected to home.  It makes me feel so regal and proud not to mention that they are a colorful addition to whatever outfit I may have on! While walking though the market-place with my aunt in Nigeria, I was overwhelmed by the array of bright fabric splayed out in front of me in the stalls. I then realized that I could share how head-wraps made me feel with other women. It’s not just a piece of fabric. It’s a piece of my home. It’s me walking though the market place thinking of the women, my customers and what they would like. My mother has handed down to me some of her own wraps and I know just how long their can last. My wraps are for women to keep and treasure for years to come.

Keep reading + more pictures

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Why girls stress over periods

secretlycapricious:

larry-stylinanal:

  • The constant fear of bleeding through clothes
  • The constant cramps
  • Having to change pads/tampons every 2-4 hours
  • Having to deal with mood swings
  • Having to deal with boys going ‘Oh someones on their period’ 
  • When you stand up its like a waterfall from your vagina
  • Craving food to calm you down
  • The constant fear that you smell of blood even though you dont 
  • CRAMPS
  • Feeling over emotional
  • CRAMPS
  • CRAMPS
  • CRAMPS

YOU MEAN I DON’T ACTUALLY SMELL LIKE BLOOD?!

(Source: vaginaforcesunite)

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